Autism Science

Increasing Exposure to Antibody-Stimulating Proteins and Polysaccharides in Vaccines Is Not Associated with Risk of Autism

Source: 
Journal of Pediatrics
Date Published: 
March 6, 2013
Abstract: 

This CDC study casts further doubt on the link between autism and vaccines. The study found no connection between the number of vaccines received and autism risk.

Autism Risk Across Generations A Population-Based Study of Advancing Grandpaternal and Paternal Age

Source: 
JAMA Psychiatry
Date Published: 
March 20, 2013
Abstract: 

Recently published in JAMA Psychiatry, this study put forth a new autism risk factor: advanced grandpaternal age. Compared to men who had children between 20 and 24, men who fathered a child at 50+ were 1-2 times more likely to have a grandchild with autism. The findings suggest some autism risk factors can accumulate over generations.

A Quantitative Link between Face Discrimination Deficits and Neuronal Selectivity for Faces in Autism

Source: 
NeuroImage: Clinical
Date Published: 
March 15, 2013
Abstract: 

In this fMRI study of adults with ASD, reduced neuronal selectivity for faces was linked to greater behavioral deficits in face recognition.

Tipping the balance of autism risk: potential mechanisms linking pesticides and autism.

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
July 2012
Abstract: 

In animal studies, we encourage more research on gene × environment interactions, as well as experimental exposure to mixtures of compounds. Similarly, epidemiologic studies in humans with exceptionally high exposures can identify which pesticide classes are of greatest concern, and studies focused on gene × environment are needed to determine if there are susceptible subpopulations at greater risk from pesticide exposures.

Maternal periconceptional folic acid intake and risk of autism spectrum disorders and developmental delay in the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment) case-control study.

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
July 2012
Abstract: 

Folic acid may reduce ASD risk in those with inefficient folate metabolism. The replication of these findings and investigations of mechanisms involved are warranted.

Advancing maternal age is associated with increasing risk for autism: a review and meta-analysis.

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
May 2012
Abstract: 

Results of this meta-analysis support an association between advancing maternal age and risk of autism. The RR increased monotonically with increasing maternal age. The association persisted after the effects of paternal age and other potential confounders had been considered, supporting an independent relation between higher maternal age and autism.

De novo mutations revealed by whole-exome sequencing are strongly associated with autism.

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
April 4, 2012
Abstract: 

Among a total of 279 identified de novo coding mutations, there is a single instance in probands, and none in siblings, in which two independent nonsense variants disrupt the same gene, SCN2A (sodium channel, voltage-gated, type II, α subunit), a result that is highly unlikely by chance.

Sporadic autism exomes reveal a highly interconnected protein network of de novo mutations.

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
April 4, 2012
Abstract: 

Results indicate extreme locus heterogeneity but also provide a target for future discovery, diagnostics and therapeutics.

Multiplex targeted sequencing identifies recurrently mutated genes in autism spectrum disorders.

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
December 21, 2012
Abstract: 

Data supports associations between specific genes and reciprocal subphenotypes (CHD8-macrocephaly and DYRK1A-microcephaly) and replicate the importance of a β-catenin-chromatin-remodeling network to ASD etiology.

Is Medication Information for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Monitored and Coordinated Across Professionals? Findings from a Teacher Survey

Source: 
School Mental Health
Date Published: 
March 1, 2013
Abstract: 

This study examined school-based medication monitoring in children with ASD. Researchers found that less than half of teachers of medicated students were aware that students were taking medication and no teachers were communicating with prescribing physicians about student behavior and side effects. Since monitoring medication across settings helps physicians assess drug safety and effectiveness, the authors argue for increased communication among professionals.