Diagnosis

New DSM Brings Change, Assurances For Those With Autism

Source: 
Disability Scoop
Date Published: 
May 19, 2013
Abstract: 

With the release of the DSM-5 comes an updated definition of autism and a major change to the way it is diagnosed.

Trophoblast Inclusions Are Significantly Increased in the Placentas of Children in Families at Risk for Autism

Source: 
Biological Psychiatry
Date Published: 
April 25, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine have figured out how to measure an infant's risk of developing autism by looking for abnormalities in his/her placenta at birth, allowing for earlier diagnosis and treatment for the developmental disorder.

Comparison of ICD-10R, DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 in an Adult Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Clinic

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
March 16, 2013
Abstract: 

With the number of people seeking ASD evaluations in adulthood on the rise, researchers sought to investigate how DSM-5 criteria would fare in a diagnostic clinic for adults with minimal intellectual disability. Compared to ICD-10R and DSM-IV-TR, DSM-5 specificity was good but sensitivity was poor: 44% of adults who met ICD-10R ASD criteria and 22% who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for Asperger syndrome or autistic disorder would not qualify for a DSM-5 ASD diagnosis.

Frequency and Pattern of Documented Diagnostic Features and the Age of Autism Identification

Source: 
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Pediatric Psychiatry
Date Published: 
February 6, 2013
Abstract: 

The age at which a child with autism is diagnosed is related to the particular suite of behavioral symptoms he or she exhibits, according to this study led by an ASF Grantee. Certain diagnostic features, including poor nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors, were associated with earlier identification of an autism spectrum disorder. Displaying more behavioral features was also associated with earlier diagnosis.

For more information about this study, read the guest blog from the lead author here: http://autismsciencefoundation.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/identifying-asd-...

Changes in Prevalence of Parent-reported Autism Spectrum Disorder in School-aged U.S. Children: 2007 to 2011–2012

Source: 
CDC
Date Published: 
March 20, 2013
Abstract: 

This report presents data on the prevalence of diagnosed autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as reported by parents of school-aged children (ages 6–17 years) in 2011–2012. Results suggest 1 in 50 U.S. children is diagnosed with ASD based on parent report.

Evaluating Changes in the Prevalence of the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs)

Source: 
Public Health Reviews
Date Published: 
March 14, 2013
Abstract: 

In effort to stimulate more research to better understand ASD trends, ASF President Alison Singer and other stakeholders discuss the increase in ASD prevalence and share their knowledge and opinions.

Autism Spectrum Disorder Reclassified: A Second Look at the 1980s Utah/UCLA Autism Epidemiologic Study

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
January 1, 2013
Abstract: 

According to this study, DSM-IV-TR criteria capture more individuals with ASD and intellectual disability than DSM III criteria. The authors examined records from a statewide epidemiological study in the 80s and found that 59% of participants who were considered ‘not autistic’ in the original study likely were autistic based on current DSM criteria and clinician review methods used in CDC studies.

The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers: Reliability in a Diverse Rural American Sample

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
February 6, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers at Virginia Tech examine M-CHAT performance in a very low socio-economic status setting and find it lacks internal consistency across ethnic and educational groups. Caregivers who reported a low maternal educational level or with minority status were more likely to mark items suggestive of autism compared to those with higher maternal education or non-minority status

How Different Are Girls and Boys Above and Below the Diagnostic Threshold for Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Source: 
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Date Published: 
August 2012
Abstract: 

A study finds that despite showing similar autistic traits, girls are less likely than boys to meet diagnostic criteria for ASD if no other intellectual or behavioral issues are present. The authors suggest the results might reflect biased diagnosis or better adaptation in girls.