Eye Tracking

Researchers Grapple with Mixed Results from Cognitive Studies

Source: 
Simons Foundation Austism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
July 30, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers at Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London are finding that some studies have suggested that people with autism have deficits in executive function, a set of complex mental processes involved in everyday life. But these results may instead reflect their difficulties imagining what other people are thinking.

Study from Children's Hospital Boston Finds Atypical Processing of Emotional Faces in ASD

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
June 2012
Abstract: 

New study using eye-tracking and event-related potentials from Children's Hospital Boston found that individuals with ASD showed atypical emotional face processing and reduced brain activation in response to emotions.

For Children With Autism, Variability In Successful Social Strategies Revealed By Eye-Tracking

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
March 5, 2012
Abstract: 

Katherine Rice and colleagues, from the Marcus Autism Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, and Emory University School of Medicine, used eye-tracking technology to measure the relationship between cognitive and social disability in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and the ability of children with ASD to pay attention to social interactions.

How Brain's Structure And Genes Affect Autism And Fragile X Syndrome

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
November 17, 2011
Abstract: 

Research just released shows that scientists are finding new tools to help understand neurodevelopmental disorders like autism and fragile X syndrome.

Scientists Reveal That Seeing Eye To Eye Is Key To Copying, With Implications For Autism Research

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
August 18, 2011
Abstract: 

In a study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team of scientists from the University's School of Psychology show that eye contact seems to act as an invitation for mimicry, triggering mechanisms in the frontal region of the brain that control imitation.

The results could be the first clues to understanding why some people, such as children with autism, struggle to grasp when they are expected to copy the actions of others in social situations.

Face Recognition Technology Could Aid Autism Therapy, Recognize A Child In Pain

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
March 7, 2011
Abstract: 

Research in computer graphics and computer vision tries to make using computers easier. We can find a more comfortable, intuitive and intelligent way to use the computer that feels like you're talking to a friend. This could also help disabled people use computers the way everyone else does.

Preference for Geometric Patterns Early in Life as a Risk Factor for Autism

Source: 
Archives of General Psychiatry, Pierce et al.
Date Published: 
January 2011
Year Published: 
2011

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego found that a preference for geometric patterns early in life may be a novel and easily detectable early signature of infants and toddlers at risk for autism. One hundred ten toddlers were presented with a  one-minute movie depicting moving geometric patterns on one side of a video monitor and children in high actions, such as dancing or doing yoga, on the other. Using this preferential looking paradigm, researchers measured total fixation duration and the number of fast eye movements within each movie type was examined using eye-tracking technology. Overall, toddlers with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as young as 14 months spent significantly more time fixating on dynamic geometric images than other diagnostic groups. If a toddler spent more than 69% of his or her time fixating on geometric patterns, then the positive predictive value for accurately classifying that toddler as having an ASD was 100%. The preference for geometric patterns among children with ASDs can be used as an early risk factor for autism, which can aid in early identification efforts.

Autistic Toddlers Prefer to Gaze at Geometric Patterns

Source: 
Bloomberg Business Week
Date Published: 
September 7, 2010
Abstract: 

Eye-tracking study reveals that a toddler's infatuation with geometric patterns instead of social interactions such as dancing, jumping and smiling could be an early sign of autism.

Infants Gaze May Be an Early, but Subtle, Marker for Autism Risk

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
September 1, 2010
Abstract: 

Kennedy Krieger Institute have announced new study results showing an early marker for later communication and social delays in infants at a higher-risk for autism may be infrequent gazing at other people when unprompted. The study also found that six-month-old high-risk infants demonstrated the same level of cause and effect learning skills when compared to low-risk infants of the same age.

Blinking Could Detect Autism

Source: 
SFARI
Date Published: 
May 21, 2010
Abstract: 

The researchers tracked eye movements and blinks in 41 2-year-olds with autism and 52 healthy controls while the children watched a short movie of two toddlers on a playground. Both groups on average blinked about five times per minute. But they differed significantly in how their blinking lined up with the content of the movie.

Healthy toddlers refrained from blinking as they watched scenes with high emotional content, such as when the toddler-actors fought about a toy. Toddlers with autism, in contrast, were just as likely to blink during emotional scenes as during dull ones.