Motor Planning

Can Autism Be Detected in Body Movement? Rutgers Pioneers New Study

Source: 
New Jersey Newsroom
Date Published: 
December 5, 2012
Abstract: 

A new method developed in the Rutgers Sensory Motor Integration Lab may reveal the typicality of a child's development. The technique measures slight fluctuations in body movement and compares them to motion patterns seen in typically developing individuals.

Minority Toddlers With Autism May Be More Delayed Than Affected Caucasian Peers

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
February 23, 2012
Abstract: 

The first prospective study of ethnic differences in the symptoms of autism in toddlers shows that children from a minority background have more delayed language, communication and gross motor skills than Caucasian children with the disorder. Researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute concluded that subtle developmental delays may be going unaddressed in minority toddlers until more severe symptoms develop.

Structure of language pathways differs in non-verbal autism

Source: 
SFARI
Date Published: 
November 14, 2011
Abstract: 

Non-verbal children with autism show structural differences in key language areas of the brain compared with controls, according to a poster presented Saturday at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

67% More Prefrontal Brain Neurons In Children With Autism

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
November 8, 2011
Abstract: 

A small study found that male children with autism had larger brain weights and 67% more prefrontal brain neurons than children without autism.

Infants Given A Social Jump Start By Early Motor Experiences: Study Indicates Infants At Risk For Autism Could Benefit From Motor Training

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
September 12, 2011
Abstract: 

In a new study published in the journal Developmental Science (Epub ahead of print), researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Vanderbilt University found that early motor experiences can shape infants' preferences for objects and faces. The study findings demonstrate that providing infants with "sticky mittens" to manipulate toys increases their subsequent interest in faces, suggesting advanced social development.

This study supports a growing body of evidence that early motor development and self-produced motor experiences contribute to infants' understanding of the social world around them. Conversely, this implies that when motor skills are delayed or impaired - as in autism - future social interactions and development could be negatively impacted.

Early motor experiences can shape infants' preferences for objects and faces

Source: 
News Medical
Date Published: 
September 9, 2011
Abstract: 

In a new study published today in the journal Developmental Science, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Vanderbilt University found that early motor experiences can shape infants' preferences for objects and faces. The study findings demonstrate that providing infants with "sticky mittens" to manipulate toys increases their subsequent interest in faces, suggesting advanced social development.

This study supports a growing body of evidence that early motor development and self-produced motor experiences contribute to infants' understanding of the social world around them. Conversely, this implies that when motor skills are delayed or impaired - as in autism - future social interactions and development could be negatively impacted.

Visual Detection and Identification More Active in Autistic Brain Than Thought

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
April 5, 2011
Abstract: 

Parts of the brains of people with autism are more active in areas that deal with visual detection and identification and less in areas for decision making, planning and execution, and cognitive control, researchers from the University of Montreal revealed in the journal Human Brain Mapping. Dr. Laurent Mottron, at CETEDUM (University of Montreal's Centre for Excellence in Pervasive Development Disorders) believes their findings explain why most people with autism tend to be extremely good at visual tasks.

Handwriting Problems Affect Children With Autism Into the Teenage Years

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
February 11, 2011
Abstract: 

A new study suggests that the handwriting problems that affect children with autism are likely to continue into their teenage years. The research found that the teenagers with autism earned 167 points out of 204 total possible points on the handwriting assessment, compared to the 183 points scored by teens in the group without autism. These results showed statistical significance in the study. The teenagers with autism also had motor skill impairments.

Surprising View of Brain Formation: Discovery of a New Mechanism May Have Implications for a Host of Diseases

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
February 10, 2011
Abstract: 

A study from The Scripps Research Institute has unveiled a surprising mechanism that controls brain formation. In the new study, Mueller and colleagues focused on a protein called reelin. They found reelin is a key player in the migration of new nerve cells to the neocortex, the part of the brain responsible for higher-order functions, such as language and movement. The findings have implications for understanding a host of diseases, including some forms of mental retardation, epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

Visual Skills Required for Independence Are Impaired in Children With Autism, Research Finds

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
December 20, 2010
Abstract: 

The ability to find shoes in the bedroom, apples in a supermarket, or a favorite animal at the zoo is impaired among children with autism, according to new research from the University of Bristol. Contrary to previous studies, which show that children with autism often demonstrate outstanding visual search skills, this new research indicates that children with autism are unable to search effectively for objects in real-life situations -- a skill that is essential for achieving independence in adulthood.