Sensory Issues

Synaesthesia is More Common in Autism

Source: 
Molecular Autism
Date Published: 
November 19, 2013
Abstract: 

New research out of the University of Cambridge and published in the journal Molecular Autism found that people with autism are more likely to have synaethesia, which involves experiencing a mixing of the senses, such as seeing colors when they hear sounds. Both autism and synaesthesia involve neural over-connectivity, perhaps the reason why synaesthesia is disproportionately common in autism.

Environmental Enrichment as an Effective Treatment for Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Source: 
Behavioral Neuroscience
Date Published: 
May 20, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers at University of California Irvine conducted a randomized controlled trial of sensorimotor enrichment in young boys with ASD. Behavioral and cognitive improvements in the children who received sensorimotor therapy suggest that it may be a promising treatment for ASD symptoms. The group is now conducting a larger trial that includes girls.

Anxiety, sensory over-responsivity, and gastrointestinal problems in children with autism spectrum disorders

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
Jan. 2013
Abstract: 

Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience high rates of anxiety, sensory processing problems, and gastrointestinal (GI) problems; however, the associations among these symptoms in children with ASD have not been previously examined. The current study examined bivariate and multivariate relations among anxiety, sensory over-responsivity, and chronic GI problems in a sample of 2,973 children with ASD enrolled in the Autism Treatment Network (ages 2-17 years, 81.6 % male).

Physical Aggression in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Date Published: 
December 27, 2012
Abstract: 

The prevalence of physical aggression was 53% across a sample of nearly 1600 children and adolescents with ASD. Girls and boys were equally likely to display aggressive behaviors. The researchers suggest sleep problems, self-injury and sensory problems may increase risk for physical aggression, and argue for better identification and treatment of these conditions.