Social Interaction

Children With An Autism Spectrum Disorder Often Victims Of Bullying

Source: 
Newsday.com
Date Published: 
September 3, 2012
Abstract: 

Nearly half of U.S. children with an autism spectrum disorder are victims of bullying, a new study from University of California at Berkeley finds.

Stanford researchers investigate the emotional side of autism

Source: 
Stanford School of Medicine
Date Published: 
August 14, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers at Stanford University have found that adults with autism spectrum disorders report greater levels of negative emotion in general.

Stanford researchers investigate the emotional side of autism

Source: 
Emotion
Date Published: 
August 14, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers at Stanford University have found that adults with autism spectrum disorders report greater levels of negative emotion in general.

How Autism is Changing the World for Everybody

Source: 
i09
Date Published: 
July 26,2012
Abstract: 

Interesting article including interviews with Steve Silberman and Andrea Kuszewski about how studying autism is changing the world for everyone!

Pets May Help Kids With Autism

Source: 
WebMD.com
Date Published: 
August 1,2012
Abstract: 

Researchers in France found that children with autism who became pet owners after the age of 5 performed better than children without pets on two key measures of social functioning -- offering comfort and offering to share. Having a pet from birth did not appear to influence the socialization behaviors, leading the researchers to conclude that the arrival of a pet when a child is old enough to recognize the addition may be critical.

Study from University of South Australia Found that Individuals with ASD had Impairments in Face Processing and Acquiring Familiar Representations

Source: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22643237
Date Published: 
May 24, 2012
Abstract: 

A new study from the University of South Australia and the University of Cambridge found that individuals with ASD had impairments in processing faces and acquiring new face representations for familiarity.

Study from UCSB Examines Teaching Initiations in Social Intervention Programs for School Children with Autism

Source: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22645399
Date Published: 
May 29, 2012
Abstract: 

A new study from UC Santa Barbara found that teaching initiations in social intervention programs improved social engagement for school children with autism.

Many with Autism Lack Work Experience

Source: 
Chicago Sun-Times
Date Published: 
May 14, 2012
Abstract: 

One in three young adults with autism has no paid job experience, college, or technical schooling nearly seven years after high school graduation, a new study finds.

Intervention Targeting Development of Socially Synchronous Engagement in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Source: 
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Date Published: 
January 2011
Year Published: 
2011

Two-year-olds with ASD showed improved social skills after completing an intervention targeting core social deficits in autism. It is the first randomized controlled trial to test such an intervention in toddlers and gives promise that a supplementary curriculum could improve social and communication skills in very young children. The researchers randomly assigned 50 toddlers with ASD, aged 21 to 33 months, to receive either an intervention called Interpersonal Synchrony - which targets social imitation, joint attention skills, and sharing of emotions - or a comparison intervention that does not target these specific social skills. Both six-month interventions were used for 10 hours per week in the classroom, and parents in both groups were given similar levels of training to continue the intervention at home. While toddlers in both groups showed gains in social, cognitive, and language skills during the study, children who received the Interpersonal Synchrony intervention, which encouraged them to communicate and play with others, had the greatest progress. At the end of the six months, these children had more than doubled the instances in which they engaged in social imitation (such as imitating the way a parent plays with a toy or mimicking a facial expression), while also making eye contact. Social imitation is believed to be critical in developing social communication skills -- deficits in such core social skills are a defining characteristic of autism. Importantly, children in the Interpersonal Synchrony group were able to generalize their newly developed skills to new people and settings. While their progress slowed in the six months following the end of the intervention, they did not lose any of the skills gained, unlike children in the comparison group who showed poorer social communication skills at the six-month follow-up.

--IACC 2011 Summary of Advances in ASD Research

Autistic Toddlers Prefer to Gaze at Geometric Patterns

Source: 
Bloomberg Business Week
Date Published: 
September 7, 2010
Abstract: 

Eye-tracking study reveals that a toddler's infatuation with geometric patterns instead of social interactions such as dancing, jumping and smiling could be an early sign of autism.