Treatments

An Epidemic of Fear: How Panicked Parents Skipping Shots Endangers Us All

Source: 
Wired Magazine
Date Published: 
October 19, 2009
Abstract: 

Paul Offit, award-winning 58-year-old scientist, is hated for his opinion on vaccination. He boldly states — in speeches, in journal articles, and in his 2008 book Autism’s False Prophets — that vaccines do not cause autism or autoimmune disease or any of the other chronic conditions that have been blamed on them. He supports this assertion with meticulous evidence. And he calls to account those who promote bogus treatments for autism — treatments that he says not only don’t work but often cause harm.

Scientists One Step Closer to Diagnosing Autism with MRI

Source: 
Sify News
Date Published: 
October 13, 2010
Abstract: 

Researchers at the University of Utah (U of U) are one step closer to diagnosing autism using MRI, an advance that eventually could help health care providers identify the problem much earlier in children and lead to improved treatment and outcomes for those with the disorder.

Preventing Life Threatening Breathing Disorder of Rett Syndrome

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
October 5, 2010
Abstract: 

A group of researchers at the University of Bristol have sequestered the potentially fatal breath holding episodes associated with the autistic-spectrum disorder Rett syndrome. Using a unique combination of drugs, they have discovered that the area of the brain that allows breathing to persist throughout life without interruption has reduced levels of a transmitter substance called aminobutyric acid.

Less Pain for Learning Gain

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
September 28, 2010
Abstract: 

Now research from Northwestern University suggests a new way of training that could reduce by at least half the effort previously thought necessary to make learning gains. They suggest combining periods of practice may alone be too brief to cause learning with periods of mere exposure to perceptual stimuli.

Hormone Oxytocin Improves Social Cognition but Only in Less Socially Proficient Individuals

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
September 21, 2010
Abstract: 

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found that the naturally-occurring hormone oxytocin selectively improves social cognitive abilities for less socially proficient individuals, but has little effect on those who are more socially proficient. While more research is required, these results highlight the potential oxytocin holds for treating social deficits in people with disorders marked by deficits in social functioning like autism.

Discovery of Key Pathway Interaction May Lead to Therapies that Aid Brain Growth and Repair

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
September 16, 2010
Abstract: 

Researchers at the Center for Neuroscience Research at Children's National Medical Center have discovered that the two major types of signaling pathways activated during brain cell development. This knowledge may help scientists design new ways to induce the brain to repair itself when these signals are interrupted, and indicate a need for further research to determine whether disruptions of these pathways in early brain development could lead to common neurodevelopmental disorders such as epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism, Down syndrome, ADHD, and intellectual disabilities.

Seaside Therapeutics Reports Positive Data from Phase 2 Study of STX209 in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Seaside Therapeutics
Date Published: 
September 9, 2010
Abstract: 

Seaside Therapeutics reported findings on STX209 at the 42nd Autism Society National Conference. STX209 is a selective gamma-amino butyric acid type B (GABA-B) receptor agonist being studied for the treatment of ASD and fragile X syndrome (FXS).

As previously reported, STX209 demonstrated statistically significant improvements across a number of global and specific neurobehavioral outcomes in the open-label Phase 2a study, including significant improvements in social impairment—a core symptom of ASD.

Minocycline Promising in Fragile X Syndrome

Source: 
Medscape Today
Date Published: 
September 7, 2010
Abstract: 

Parents of children with fragile X syndrome report that minocycline led to positive improvements in language, attention levels and behavior. They also report experiencing adverse side effects such as mild gastrointestinal issues and some increased irritability.

Structural Basis for Autism Disorders

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
August 25, 2010
Abstract: 

There is still much that is unknown about autism spectrum disorders, but a University of Nevada, Reno psychologist has added to the body of knowledge that researchers around the world are compiling to try to demystify, prevent and treat the mysterious condition.

Cambridge's Seaside at Forefront of new approach to Fragile X

Source: 
The Boston Globe
Date Published: 
August 23, 2010
Abstract: 

The story of Matthew, a 9-year-old with Fragile X Syndrome, is one of the first patients on one of the first medications ever developed specifically to address the causes of an autism-like disorder. And — at least for him — it seems to be working.