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Large Study Underscores Role of Gene Copy Number in Autism

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
June 2, 2014
Abstract: 

People with autism tend to carry mutations that duplicate or delete several genes at once, according to a large study published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Previous studies have shown that people with autism have more large deletions or duplications of DNA, also known as copy number variations (CNVs), than controls do. The new study, the largest to look at CNVs in people with autism thus far, confirms this finding. It also found that in people with autism, the CNVs are more likely to affect genes linked to intellectual disability and fragile X syndrome.

Elevated Fetal Steroidogenic Activity in Autism

Source: 
Molecular Psychiatry
Date Published: 
June 3, 2014
Abstract: 

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have found that children who later develop autism are exposed to heightened levels of steroid hormones (such as testosterone, progesterone and cortisol) in the womb. This finding may be related to the fact that autism affects males more than females.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Joins Autism BrainNet Tissue Bank

Source: 
Newswise
Date Published: 
May 29, 2014
Abstract: 

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has joined Autism BrainNet, a new network of research institutions created to collect, store and distribute postmortem brain tissue resources that will help scientists gain a deeper understanding of the causes, treatment and cure of autism spectrum disorder, which now affects an estimated one in 68 children. Launched by the Simons Foundation and Autism Speaks, Autism BrainNet recently joined with the Autism Science Foundation to unveil the Autism BrainNet registration site, It Takes Brains (www.TakesBrains.org)

Takeaways from IMFAR 2014

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
May 22, 2014
Abstract: 

Top three takeaways from IMFAR 2014: autism is growing up, the future looks promising, and scientists are getting social.

Adults with Autism May Have High Burden of Health Problems

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
May 17, 2014
Abstract: 

Adults with autism may suffer from various health problems, ranging from psychiatric conditions to motor symptoms that resemble Parkinson’s disease, according to two studies presented Thursday at the 2014 International Meeting for Autism Research in Atlanta.

School in Upstate NY Saves Autistic Queens Man from Troubled Life

Source: 
NY Daily News
Date Published: 
May 19, 2014
Abstract: 

A great story featuring the Center for Discovery, and including a picture of ASF President Alison Singer's daughter, Jodie.

Examining the Federal Response to Autism Spectrum Disorders: Government Oversight Committee Meets Today

Date Published: 
May 20, 2014
Abstract: 

Today at 9:00am the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform meets for a hearing entitled "Examining the Federal Response to Autism Spectrum Disorders". A live stream of the hearing is available at http://oversight.house.gov/hearing/examining-federal-response-autism-spe...

Click here for a letter to the commitee from ASF President Alison Singer.

It Takes Brains: Autism BrainNet registration site launches

Source: 
Medical Xpress
Date Published: 
May 16, 2014
Abstract: 

The Simons Foundation, Autism Speaks and the Autism Science Foundation today announced the launch of the Autism BrainNet registration site, It Takes Brains (www.takesbrains.org). Autism BrainNet is a consortium of academic sites funded collaboratively by the Simons Foundation and Autism Speaks to collect, store and distribute brain tissue resources necessary for researchers to understand the underlying neurobiology and genetics of autism.

Tuberous Sclerosis, Fragile X Share immune Changes

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
May 6, 2014
Abstract: 

Two autism-related disorders — fragile X syndrome and tuberous sclerosis complex — share disruptions in the immune system despite major differences in the individual genes affected, reports a study in Molecular Autism. An abnormally regulated immune system is linked to some forms of autism, but exactly how genetic changes in the immune system contribute to autism is unclear.