Applied Behavior Analysis

Why Are There So Many Unsubstantiated Treatments in Autism?

Source: 
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Date Published: 
December 27, 2012
Abstract: 

An estimated 32-92% of parents use complementary/alternative treatments for their children with ASD despite the lack of scientific evidence for the efficacy of these methods. In this article, researchers issue a call for a standardized way to select and evaluate treatments. Barriers to successful treatment, including high costs, limited availability, parental compliance and poor recommendations from professionals are discussed.

States Split On Mandating ABA Coverage Under Health Law

Source: 
Disability Scoop
Date Published: 
January 18, 2013
Abstract: 

Despite a requirement that insurers start covering behavioral health treatment for individuals and small groups, a new analysis suggests less than half of states plan to include autism therapy.

ABA Therapy OK’d for More Military Kids

Source: 
Disability Scoop
Date Published: 
January 7, 2013
Abstract: 

More military families will have access to ABA under a new government program.

Autism Interventions Supported by Moderate Evidence; Better Studies Needed to Validate Effectiveness

Source: 
RAND Corporation
Date Published: 
November 1, 2012
Abstract: 

Widely used autism interventions are supported by moderate evidence. Head-to-head trials of competing autism treatments are needed to identify which programs are superior and additional work should follow study participants long-term to further examine the effectiveness of treatments.

Researchers Grapple with Mixed Results from Cognitive Studies

Source: 
Simons Foundation Austism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
July 30, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers at Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London are finding that some studies have suggested that people with autism have deficits in executive function, a set of complex mental processes involved in everyday life. But these results may instead reflect their difficulties imagining what other people are thinking.

Understanding Why Autistic People May Reject Social Touch

Source: 
Time Magazine
Date Published: 
March 20, 2012
Abstract: 

Now, a new study offers insight into why some people shrug off physical touches and how families affected by autism may learn to share hugs without overwhelming an autistic child’s senses.

Families cling to hope of autism 'recovery'

Source: 
LA Times
Date Published: 
December 15, 2011
Abstract: 

An autism treatment called applied behavior analysis, or ABA, has wide support and has grown into a profitable business. It has its limits, though, and there are gaps in the science.

Children With Autism Benefit from Early, Intensive Therapy

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
September 28, 2011
Abstract: 

A primary characteristic of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is impairments in social-communication skills. Children and adolescents with social-communication problems face difficulty understanding, interacting and relating with others. University of Missouri researchers found that children who receive more intensive therapy to combat these impairments, especially at early ages, achieve the best outcomes.

Gene Linked to Severity of Autism's Social Dysfunction Identified

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
April 7, 2011
Abstract: 

With the help of two sets of brothers with autism, Johns Hopkins scientists have identified a gene associated with autism that appears to be linked very specifically to the severity of social interaction deficits. The gene, GRIP1 (glutamate receptor interacting protein 1), is a blueprint for a traffic-directing protein at synapses -- those specialized contact points between brain cells across which chemical signals flow.

Virtual Conversation Simulator Found Beneficial for Adults with Autism

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
March 20, 2011
Abstract: 

Simulated interactions in which adults with autism converse with a virtual partner may help them develop better social interaction skills, according to a novel study presented in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.