Early Intervention

Preschool Based JASPER Intervention in Minimally Verbal Children with Autism: Pilot RCT

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
May 1, 2013
Abstract: 

A recent pilot study linked the JASPER intervention (Joint Attention Symbolic Play Engagement and Regulation) to core deficit improvement in minimally verbal 3 to 5 year olds with autism.

Why Are There So Many Unsubstantiated Treatments in Autism?

Source: 
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Date Published: 
December 27, 2012
Abstract: 

An estimated 32-92% of parents use complementary/alternative treatments for their children with ASD despite the lack of scientific evidence for the efficacy of these methods. In this article, researchers issue a call for a standardized way to select and evaluate treatments. Barriers to successful treatment, including high costs, limited availability, parental compliance and poor recommendations from professionals are discussed.

Mothers Fight to Pass Ava's Law for Autism Coverage

Source: 
CNN
Date Published: 
March 12, 2013
Abstract: 

"If passed, Ava's Law would require insurance companies to pay for "evidence-driven treatment" -- or treatment that's been scientifically shown to help kids with an autism spectrum disorder. The law would not affect the self-insured plans offered by bigger companies, which cover about 60% of insured people in the state, according to the Georgia Office of Insurance."

Beyond Autism: A Baby Siblings Research Consortium Study of High-risk Children at Three Years of Age

Source: 
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Date Published: 
February 8, 2013
Abstract: 

This study is the first large-scale examination of ASD behavioral characteristics and developmental functioning in high-risk (HR), non-autistic 3-year-olds with siblings on the spectrum. 79% of HR children were either no different from low-risk children (LR; no known ASD family history) with respect to ASD behavioral severity and developmental functioning, or were developmentally on target with high levels of ASD-related behaviors. 21% of HR children with no ASD diagnosis had an "early manifestation" of a broad autism phenotype: high levels of ASD-related behaviors and/or low levels of verbal and nonverbal functioning. The authors highlight the importance of developmental surveillance and intervention for this HR subset.

Use of Social Stories to Improve Self-Regulation in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics
Date Published: 
February 26, 2013
Abstract: 

Social stories, an intervention used to define a skill, concept or situation in socially appropriate terms, were used to promote self-regulation techniques in a self-contained preschool classroom. While implementation of self-regulation strategies varied among the children, all showed an increase in desired behaviors with the intervention.

Decreased Spontaneous Attention to Social Scenes in 6-Month-Old Infants Later Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Biological Psychiatry
Date Published: 
January 14, 2013
Abstract: 

Yale researchers used eye-tracking technology to examine social monitoring skills of infants at high and low risk for autism. Compared to infants who developed typically, six-month olds later diagnosed with ASD looked less at the social scene, which involved a woman engaged in various activities. When they did attend to the social scene, they spent less time viewing the woman’s face.

The Effects of A Weighted Vest on Aggressive and Self-injurious Behavior in a Child with Autism

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
January 2, 2013
Abstract: 

Research finds that despite their frequent use, weighted vests have little effect on managing challenging behaviors in children with autism.

Differences in Autism Symptoms Between Minority and Non-Minority Toddlers

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
September 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers discover gross motor, communication and language score differences between minority and non-minority toddlers with ASD. The authors suggest that due to cultural differences, minority parents may not seek intervention services until more significant delays are present. Methods to improve early identification in these groups are discussed.