Gastroenterology

Gastrointestinal problems in children with autism, developmental delays or typical development

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disororders
Date Published: 
November 6, 2013

"To compare gastrointestinal (GI) problems among children with: (1) autism spectrum disorder (ASD), (2) developmental delay (DD) and (3) typical development (TD), GI symptom frequencies were obtained for 960 children from the Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment (CHARGE) study. We also examined scores on five Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) subscales comparing ASD children with high versus low frequency GI symptoms. Compared to TD children, those with ASD [aOR 7.92 (4.89-12.85)] and DD [aOR 4.55 (2.51-8.24)] were more likely to have at least one frequent GI symptom. Restricting to ASD children, those with frequent abdominal pain, gaseousness, diarrhea, constipation or pain on stooling scored worse on irritability, social withdrawal, stereotypy, and hyperactivity compared with children having no frequent GI symptoms. Frequent GI problems affect young children with ASD and DD more commonly than those with TD. Maladaptive behaviors correlate with GI problems, suggesting these comorbidities require attention."

Gastrointestinal problems in children with autism, developmental delays or typical development

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disororders
Date Published: 
November 6, 2013

"To compare gastrointestinal (GI) problems among children with: (1) autism spectrum disorder (ASD), (2) developmental delay (DD) and (3) typical development (TD), GI symptom frequencies were obtained for 960 children from the Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment (CHARGE) study. We also examined scores on five Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) subscales comparing ASD children with high versus low frequency GI symptoms. Compared to TD children, those with ASD [aOR 7.92 (4.89-12.85)] and DD [aOR 4.55 (2.51-8.24)] were more likely to have at least one frequent GI symptom. Restricting to ASD children, those with frequent abdominal pain, gaseousness, diarrhea, constipation or pain on stooling scored worse on irritability, social withdrawal, stereotypy, and hyperactivity compared with children having no frequent GI symptoms. Frequent GI problems affect young children with ASD and DD more commonly than those with TD. Maladaptive behaviors correlate with GI problems, suggesting these comorbidities require attention."

Gut Microbes Linked to Autismlike Symptoms in Mice

Source: 
Science Magazine
Date Published: 
December 5, 2013
Abstract: 

More information has come about about the gut microbes study in Cell. "I'd want to know more about the mechanism by which the bacteria altered behavior in the mice before beginning to translate the findings to humans" says Emanuel DiCicco-Bloom, a neuroscientist at Rutgers University and member of the ASF Scientific Advisory Board.

Bacterium Can Reverse Autism-Like Behaviour in Mice

Source: 
Cell
Date Published: 
December 5, 2013
Abstract: 

Caltech researchers gave probiotics to mice that had been bred to have autism-like symptoms and found promising results. After being given the probiotics, the mice were more communicative and less anxious. The treatment also reduced gastrointestinal problems in the animals that were similar to those that often accompany autism in humans.

Study Finds No Link Between ASDs and Celiac Disease

Source: 
JAMA Psychiatry
Date Published: 
September 25, 2013
Abstract: 

A new nationwide study conducted in Sweden and published in JAMA Psychiatry found there to be no link between celiac disease and autism spectrum disorders. There was, however, some evidence that people who have been diagnosed with autism are more sensitive to gluten, even though they don't have celiac disease. The design of the study did not allow for a conclusion that gluten sensitivity caused autism, nor vice versa.

Dr. Susan Hyman Discusses GI Problems in Children with Autism for a Guest Blog Post

Date Published: 
July 30, 2013
Abstract: 

Dr. Susan Hyman addressed many important questions about GI problems associated with autism for our guest blog series "Comorbid Conditions with Autism". In the post, she provided an informed update on current evidence-based research in the area of GI problems and autism.

Increasing the Gut Bacteria In Mice That Lack Them Helps Increase Their Sociability with Familiar Mice

Source: 
Molecular Psychiatry
Date Published: 
May 21, 2013
Abstract: 

A new study finds that increasing the gut bacteria populations in mice that lack them helps to increase their sociability. The increase in sociability is mainly limited to familiar mice but the study does show support for the theory of a connection between the gut and autism in certain cases.

Gluten Sensitivities May Cause GI Problems in Children with Autism

Source: 
PLoS One
Date Published: 
June 18, 2013
Abstract: 

A subset of children with autism displays increased immune reactivity to gluten, the mechanism of which appears to be distinct from that in celiac disease. The increased anti-gliadin antibody response and its association with GI symptoms points to a potential mechanism involving immunologic and/or intestinal permeability abnormalities in affected children.

Individuals With Autism Have a Unique Gene Expression In Their Gastrointestinal Tissue.

Source: 
PLoS One
Date Published: 
March 8, 2013
Abstract: 

This Wake Forest Study compared the gene expression of gastrointestinal tissue in individuals with autism and compared it to individuals with Crohn's Disease, ulcerative colitis and a control group. The study showed those with autism had a unique gene expression in their gastrointestinal tissue compared to the other groups studied.

Maternal Periconceptional Folic Acid Intake and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Developmental Delay in the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment) Case-control Study.

Source: 
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Date Published: 
May 30, 2012
Abstract: 

Maternal periconceptional folic acid intake may reduce ASD risk in those with inefficient folate metabolism