Gastroenterology

Popular Autism Diet Does Not Demonstrate Behavioral Improvement

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
May 20, 2010
Abstract: 

A popular belief that specific dietary changes can improve the symptoms of children with autism was not supported by a tightly controlled University of Rochester study, which found that eliminating gluten and casein from the diets of children with autism had no impact on their behavior, sleep or bowel patterns.

GI Problems and Autism Link? Experts Say No

Source: 
ABC News
Date Published: 
April 16, 2010
Abstract: 

British Medical Journal examined the continued belief by many of a possible connection between the developmental disorder and the chronic inflammatory bowel disease, that was first dubbed "autistic enterocolitis" by British physician Dr. Andrew Wakefield. But beyond Wakefield's account, the evidence of any connection between bowel disease and autism is slim, the editorial stated.

Retraction-IIleal-Lymphoid-Nodular Hyperplasia Non-Specific Colitis, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder in Children

Source: 
Lancet
Date Published: 
February 2010
Year Published: 
2010

Dr. Andrew Wakefield's study, in which he investigated a consecutive series of children with chronic enterocolitis and regressive developmental disorder and found associated gastrointestinal disease and developmental regression in a group of previously normal children, which was generally associated in time with possible environmental triggers is retracted.

Incidence of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children With Autism: A Population-Based

Source: 
Pediatrics, Ibrahim, Voigt, Katusic, Weaver, and Barbaresi
Date Published: 
August 2009
Year Published: 
2009

The Mayo Clinic study finds that autistic kids in the study were more likely than their nonautistic counterparts to be picky eaters or constipated. But the researchers did not find a significant difference between the two groups when it came to diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, bloating, reflux or vomiting.

According to Pediatrics, "as constipation and feeding issues/food selectivity often have a behavioral etiology, data suggest that a neurobehavioral rather than a primary organic gastrointestinal etiology may account for the higher incidence of these gastrointestinal symptoms in children with autism."

For years, parents, physicians and researchers have wondered whether people with autism suffered from more digestive problems than the rest of the population. Many autistic children are following aggressive medical regimens aimed at treating suspected gut trouble, including multiple nutritional supplements, and anti-fungal, anti viral and antibiotics medications. Some also are on a restrictive diet.

Lack of Association between Measles Virus Vaccine and Autism with Enteropathy: A Case-Control Study

Source: 
PLOS ONE, Hornig, Briese, et al
Date Published: 
2008

This study provides strong evidence against association of autism with persistent MV RNA in the GI tract or MMR exposure. Autism with GI disturbances is associated with elevated rates of regression in language or other skills and may represent an endophenotype distinct from other ASD.