Language

iPads Help Late-Speaking Children with Autism Develop Language

Source: 
Vanderbilt University
Date Published: 
November 12, 2013
Abstract: 

New research out of Vanderbilt Peabody College of education and human development found that using speech-generating devices, such as iPads, to encourage children ages 5 to 8 to develop speaking skills resulted in the subjects developing considerably more spoken words compared to other interventions. All of the children in the study learned new spoken words and several learned to produce short sentences as they moved through the training.

Genetic Link Between Family Members with Autism and Language Impairment

Source: 
American Journal of Psychiatry
Date Published: 
October 30, 2013
Abstract: 

New research shows a genetic link between individuals with autism and family members with specific speech and language difficulties otherwise unexplained by cognitive or physical problems. Researchers discovered that genes in a small region of two chromosomes can lead to one family member developing autism and another family member only developing language impairment.

Familiarity Breeds Support: Speech-language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Bullying of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Journal of Communication Disorders
Date Published: 
January 31, 2013
Abstract: 

According to this study, school-based speech language pathologists may be an untapped resource in the fight against bullying of children with ASD.

Atypical Brain Activation Patterns During a Face-to-Face Joint Attention Game in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Source: 
Human Brain Mapping
Date Published: 
April 16, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers used fMRI while participants played a joint-attention game to better understand the neural correlates of joint attention.

Predictors of Phrase and Fluent Speech in Children With Autism and Severe Language Delay

Source: 
Pediatrics
Date Published: 
March 4, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers at Kennedy Krieger examined prevalence and predictors of language attainment in severely language-delayed children with ASD. 70% of the sample attained phrase speech and 47% attained fluent speech at or after age 4, indicating that later gains in language are likely in toddlers with severely delayed language. Children with high nonverbal intelligence and high levels of social interest and engagement were most likely to attain language. ASD-related features such as repetitive and sensory behaviors were not associated with language attainment.

Age of First Words Predicts Cognitive Ability and Adaptive Skills in Children with ASD

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
February 1, 2013
Abstract: 

Producing words by 2 years of age strongly predicted better outcomes in this study of language acquisition and later functioning in children with ASD. The authors suggest that the "acquiring useful language by age 5" criterion for positive prognosis can be updated.

Impaired Language Pathways in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Cerebral Cortex
Date Published: 
June 1, 2012
Abstract: 

"The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between language pathways and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). "

Atypical Audiovisual Speech Integration In Infants At Risk For Autism

Source: 
PLOS One
Date Published: 
May 15, 2012
Abstract: 

"The language difficulties often seen in individuals with autism might stem from an inability to integrate audiovisual information, a skill important for language development. We investigated whether 9-month-old siblings of older children with autism, who are at an increased risk of developing autism, are able to integrate audiovisual speech cues."

Differences in Autism Symptoms Between Minority and Non-Minority Toddlers

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
September 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers discover gross motor, communication and language score differences between minority and non-minority toddlers with ASD. The authors suggest that due to cultural differences, minority parents may not seek intervention services until more significant delays are present. Methods to improve early identification in these groups are discussed.

Portable Intermodal Preferential Looking (IPL): Investigating Language Comprehension in Typically Developing Toddlers and Young Children with Autism.

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
December 14, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers at UCONN have developed an intermodel preferential looking assessment that relies on the child's attention, rather than verbal or gestural responses, to evaluate language comprehension.