Mothers

Early Life Influences Risk for Psychiatric Disorders

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
August 18, 2010
Abstract: 

For more than a century, clinical investigators have focused on early life as a source of adult psychopathology. Although the hypothesized mechanisms have evolved, a central notion remains: early life is a period of unique sensitivity during which experience confers enduring effects.

IVF Linked to Autism

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
June 14, 2010
Abstract: 

The first "test tube baby" was born in 1978. With advances in reproductive science, an estimated one percent of all American babies are now born each year through in vitro fertilization (IVF). But IVF and other assisted fertility treatments may be solving one problem by creating another, suggests new evidence from Tel Aviv University.

Studies Link Infertility to Autism

Source: 
Time
Date Published: 
May 20, 2010
Abstract: 

A study, conducted by a team at the Harvard School of Public Health, found that autism was nearly twice as common among the children of women who were treated with the ovulation-inducing drug Clomid and other similar drugs than women who did not suffer from infertility, and the link persisted even after researchers accounted for the women's age. Moreover, the association between fertility drugs and autism appeared to strengthen with exposure: the longer women reported being treated for infertility, the higher the chances their child had an autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Autism Families: High Divorce Rate is a Myth

Source: 
Web MD
Date Published: 
May 19, 2010
Abstract: 

Parents of autistic children often hear that the divorce rate in families with autism is 80%, but a new study debunks that figure as a myth. There really weren't any significant differences in terms of family structure when you consider children with autism and those without.

Vaccines: The Reality Behind The Debate

Source: 
Parents Magazine
Date Published: 
April 12, 2010
Abstract: 

Wary parents want to protect their child from any possible risk. It's time to inject a dose of reality into the rumor-driven debate.

Link Between Advanced Maternal Age and Autism Confirmed

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
February 8, 2010
Abstract: 

Advanced maternal age is linked to a significantly elevated risk of having a child with autism, regardless of the father's age, according to an exhaustive study of all births in California during the 1990s by UC Davis Health System researchers. Advanced paternal age is associated with elevated autism risk only when the father is older and the mother is under 30, the study found.

Those Kids

Source: 
Huffington Post
Date Published: 
December 15, 2009
Abstract: 

Disgruntled mother writes about her frustrations with the use of the phrase "Those Kids" by community members to describe autistic children like her son.

Autism Treatment: Success Stories More Persuasive To Some than Hard Data

Source: 
Chicago Tribune
Date Published: 
November 22, 2009

Parents often swear their children with autism get better while they are undergoing alternative therapies. Pitches from doctors providing alternative treatments are difficult to resist, he said. But in evaluating a therapy, the challenge is determining how much, if any, of the progress can be credited to the treatment. Some parents are beginning to realize their child was progressing despite the use of alternative treatments.

California Dept of Health Publishes Study on Autism and Maternal/Paternal Age

Source: 
American Journal of Epidemiology
Date Published: 
October 5, 2009
Abstract: 

Reviewing a larger population than in any other study of its kind, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has found that as parents age their risk of giving birth to a child with autism increases modestly. Published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, the new CDPH study shows that for each 10-year increase in a mother’s age, the risk of autism increased by about 38 percent. For each 10-year increase in a father’s age, the risk of autism increased by about 22 percent.

Autism: Maternally derived antibodies specific for fetal brain proteins

Source: 
Neurotoxicology, Braunschweig, Ashwood, et al
Date Published: 
2008
Year Published: 
2008

Autism is a profound disorder of neurodevelopment with poorly understood biological origins. A potential role for maternal autoantibodies in the etiology of some cases of autism has been proposed in previous studies To investigate this hypothesis, maternal plasma antibodies against human fetal and adult brain proteins were analyzed by western blot in 61 mothers of children with autistic disorder and 102 controls matched for maternal age and birth year (62 mothers of typically developing children (TD) and 40 mothers of children with non-ASD developmental delays (DD)). We observed reactivity to two protein bands at approximately 73kDa and 37kDa in plasma from 7 of 61 (11.5%) mothers of children with autism (AU) against fetal but not adult brain, which was not noted in either control group (TD; 0/62 p=0.0061 and DD; 0/40 p=0.0401). Further, the presence of reactivity to these two bands correlated with a diagnosis of behavioral regression in the child when compared to the TD (p=0.0019) and DD (0.0089) groups. Individual reactivity to the 37kDa band was observed significantly more often in the AU population compared with TD (p=0.0086) and DD (p=0.002) mothers, yielding a 5.69-fold odds ratio (95% confidence interval 2.09 - 15.51) associated with this band. The presence of these antibodies in the plasma of some mothers of children with autism, as well as the differential findings between mothers of children with early onset and regressive autism may suggest an association between the transfer of IgG autoantibodies during early neurodevelopment and the risk of developing of autism in some children.