Prevalence

Excess Mortality and Causes of Death in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Follow Up of the 1980s Utah/UCLA Autism Epidemiologic Study

Source: 
J Autism Dev Disord
Date Published: 
May, 2013
Year Published: 
2013
Abstract: 

This study's purpose was to investigate mortality among individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) ascertained during a 1980s statewide autism prevalence study (n = 305) in relation to controls.

Study Examines the Effects of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) on Autism Risk

Source: 
JAMA Psychiatry
Date Published: 
July 3, 2013
Abstract: 

This study found that most in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures do not show an increase in the risk of autism. However, it found a small increase in the risk of autism in the most severe forms of male infertility that require surgical sperm retrieval.

Association of Maternal Exposure to Childhood Abuse With Elevated Risk for Autism in Offspring

Source: 
JAMA Psychiatry
Date Published: 
March 20, 2013
Abstract: 

This study examined the relationship between maternal childhood abuse and autism in children in a large population-based sample. Maternal abuse was significantly associated with increased autism risk even after researchers controlled for perinatal risk factors, including gestational diabetes, smoking during pregnancy, preeclampsia, exposure to intimate partner violence and premature birth.

Changes in Prevalence of Parent-reported Autism Spectrum Disorder in School-aged U.S. Children: 2007 to 2011–2012

Source: 
CDC
Date Published: 
March 20, 2013
Abstract: 

This report presents data on the prevalence of diagnosed autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as reported by parents of school-aged children (ages 6–17 years) in 2011–2012. Results suggest 1 in 50 U.S. children is diagnosed with ASD based on parent report.

Evaluating Changes in the Prevalence of the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs)

Source: 
Public Health Reviews
Date Published: 
March 14, 2013
Abstract: 

In effort to stimulate more research to better understand ASD trends, ASF President Alison Singer and other stakeholders discuss the increase in ASD prevalence and share their knowledge and opinions.

Autism Spectrum Disorder Reclassified: A Second Look at the 1980s Utah/UCLA Autism Epidemiologic Study

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
January 1, 2013
Abstract: 

According to this study, DSM-IV-TR criteria capture more individuals with ASD and intellectual disability than DSM III criteria. The authors examined records from a statewide epidemiological study in the 80s and found that 59% of participants who were considered ‘not autistic’ in the original study likely were autistic based on current DSM criteria and clinician review methods used in CDC studies.

Migration and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Population-based Study

Source: 
The British Journal of Psychiatry
Date Published: 
August 2012
Abstract: 

Results of this study show that while children of migrant parents are at an increased risk of low-functioning autism, they are at a decreased risk for high-functioning autism. Researchers call for further research to determine if environmental factors associated with migration influence the development of autism.

The Rising Prevalence of Autism: A Prospective Longitudinal Study in the Faroe Islands

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
September 2012
Abstract: 

"We have followed up a 2002 population study of autism prevalence in 15-24-year olds in the Faroe Islands. The rate of ASD grew significantly from 0.56% in 2002 to 0.94% in 2009. Although these results are within the range of typical findings from other studies, there were some interesting details. There were-in addition to 43 originally diagnosed cases in 2002-24 newly discovered cases in 2009 and nearly half of them were females. It is possible that unfamiliarity with the clinical presentation of autism in females have played a significant role in this context. There was diagnostic stability for the overall category of ASD over time in the group diagnosed in childhood (7-16) years, but considerable variability as regards diagnostic sub-groupings."