Social Interaction

Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Results of an 18-month Feasibility Study

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
April 26, 2013
Abstract: 

New findings from a small pilot study suggest cognitive enhancement therapy is a feasible and effective intervention for cognitive impairments in verbal adults with ASD. Adult participants were highly satisfied with the therapy and treatment attendance was high, indicating their willingness to participate in and commit to an intervention that they considered useful.

Social Participation Among Young Adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
April 25, 2013
Abstract: 

In an attempt to raise awareness of the unique obstacles faced by young adults with ASD, researchers compared their social experiences with the experiences of young adults who received special education services for intellectual disability, emotional disturbance, or learning disability and found young adults with ASD experienced significantly more social isolation.

Familiarity Breeds Support: Speech-language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Bullying of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Journal of Communication Disorders
Date Published: 
January 31, 2013
Abstract: 

According to this study, school-based speech language pathologists may be an untapped resource in the fight against bullying of children with ASD.

Cognition and Behavior: 'Mind blindness' Has Brain Signature

Source: 
SFARI
Date Published: 
April 13, 2013
Abstract: 

Two recent studies have linked ‘mind-blindness’ to atypical patterns of brain activity in people with ASD.

Brief Report: Is Cognitive Rehabilitation Needed in Verbal Adults with Autism? Insights from Initial Enrollment in a Trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
February 5, 2013
Abstract: 

Early results from this pilot trial of cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) indicate that despite above-average intelligence, verbal adults with ASD can have significantly impaired neurocognition and social cognition. The authors suggest CET, which is designed to remediate both social and non-social deficits through computer-based neurocognitive training, could be useful for cognitive rehabilitation in this population.

Frequency and Pattern of Documented Diagnostic Features and the Age of Autism Identification

Source: 
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Pediatric Psychiatry
Date Published: 
February 6, 2013
Abstract: 

The age at which a child with autism is diagnosed is related to the particular suite of behavioral symptoms he or she exhibits, according to this study led by an ASF Grantee. Certain diagnostic features, including poor nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors, were associated with earlier identification of an autism spectrum disorder. Displaying more behavioral features was also associated with earlier diagnosis.

For more information about this study, read the guest blog from the lead author here: http://autismsciencefoundation.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/identifying-asd-...

A Quantitative Link between Face Discrimination Deficits and Neuronal Selectivity for Faces in Autism

Source: 
NeuroImage: Clinical
Date Published: 
March 15, 2013
Abstract: 

In this fMRI study of adults with ASD, reduced neuronal selectivity for faces was linked to greater behavioral deficits in face recognition.

Sleep disruption as a correlate to cognitive and adaptive behavior problems in autism spectrum disorders.

Source: 
PubMed
Date Published: 
Sept-Oct 2012
Abstract: 

Results suggested that children who slept fewer hours per night had lower overall intelligence, verbal skills, overall adaptive functioning, daily living skills, socialization skills, and motor development.

Atypical Brain Activation Patterns During a Face-to-Face Joint Attention Game in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Source: 
Human Brain Mapping
Date Published: 
April 16, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers used fMRI while participants played a joint-attention game to better understand the neural correlates of joint attention.