Speech

Spatial, Verbal Skills in Autism Even Out with Age

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
February 14, 2014
Abstract: 

A rigorous new study confirms that boys with autism tend to score higher on tests of spatial and analytical abilities than on those for verbal skills. But the gap decreases by the time they reach 10 years of age. This suggests that the trait cannot be used to define children with autism or their families, the researchers say. Instead, it may be a pattern of development common in children with autism or other developmental disorders. The report was published in the January issue of the American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Senses of Sight and Sound Separated in Children with Autism

Source: 
Vanderbilt University
Date Published: 
January 14, 2014
Abstract: 

Like watching a foreign movie that was badly dubbed, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have trouble integrating simultaneous information from their eyes and their ears, according to a Vanderbilt study. The study, led by Mark Wallace, Ph.D., director of the Vanderbilt Brain Institute, is the first to illustrate the link and strongly suggests that deficits in the sensory building blocks for language and communication can ultimately hamper social and communication skills in children with autism.

iPads Help Late-Speaking Children with Autism Develop Language

Source: 
Vanderbilt University
Date Published: 
November 12, 2013
Abstract: 

New research out of Vanderbilt Peabody College of education and human development found that using speech-generating devices, such as iPads, to encourage children ages 5 to 8 to develop speaking skills resulted in the subjects developing considerably more spoken words compared to other interventions. All of the children in the study learned new spoken words and several learned to produce short sentences as they moved through the training.

Genetic Link Between Family Members with Autism and Language Impairment

Source: 
American Journal of Psychiatry
Date Published: 
October 30, 2013
Abstract: 

New research shows a genetic link between individuals with autism and family members with specific speech and language difficulties otherwise unexplained by cognitive or physical problems. Researchers discovered that genes in a small region of two chromosomes can lead to one family member developing autism and another family member only developing language impairment.

Study of Nonverbal Autism Must Go Beyond Words, Experts Say

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute
Date Published: 
September 2, 2013
Abstract: 

About one fourth of people with autism are minimally verbal or nonverbal. Early intervention programs have been helping children develop language skills, but researchers say that seemingly unrelated issues such as motor skills and joint attention may hold the key to communication development.

Voices May Not Trigger Brain's Reward Centers in Children with ASD

Source: 
PNAS
Date Published: 
June 17, 2013
Abstract: 

This Stanford study identifies an underconnectivity between the voice-selective cortex and the reward centers in the brain. This could suggest why children with autism have trouble grasping the social and emotional aspects of human speech.

Predictors of Phrase and Fluent Speech in Children With Autism and Severe Language Delay

Source: 
Pediatrics
Date Published: 
March 4, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers at Kennedy Krieger examined prevalence and predictors of language attainment in severely language-delayed children with ASD. 70% of the sample attained phrase speech and 47% attained fluent speech at or after age 4, indicating that later gains in language are likely in toddlers with severely delayed language. Children with high nonverbal intelligence and high levels of social interest and engagement were most likely to attain language. ASD-related features such as repetitive and sensory behaviors were not associated with language attainment.

Early Intervention Could Help Autistic Children Learn to Speak

Source: 
Scientific American
Date Published: 
July 17, 2012
Abstract: 

New follow-up study shows long-term language improvement for kids with autism after an intensive, targeted behavioral therapy program.

Structure of language pathways differs in non-verbal autism

Source: 
SFARI
Date Published: 
November 14, 2011
Abstract: 

Non-verbal children with autism show structural differences in key language areas of the brain compared with controls, according to a poster presented Saturday at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, D.C.