Treatments

Special Report: New Drugs, Fresh Hope for Autism Patients

Source: 
Reuters
Date Published: 
May 31, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers are conducting advanced trials of the first drugs expressly designed to correct the genetically induced signaling problems in the brain that result in autism. The early indications are positive enough to offer new hope for families and spark interest from drug companies.

Researchers are conducting advanced trials of the first drugs expressly designed to correct the genetically induced signaling problems in the brain that result in autism. The early indications are positive enough to offer new hope for families and spark interest from drug companies.

Antioxidants For Autism

Source: 
Biological Psychiatry
Date Published: 
June 1, 2012
Abstract: 

A specific antioxidant supplement containing N-Acetylcysteine, or NAC may be an effective therapy for some features of autism, according to a pilot trial from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital that involved 31 children with the disorder.

A specific antioxidant supplement containing N-Acetylcysteine, or NAC may be an effective therapy for some features of autism, according to a pilot trial from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital that involved 31 children with the disorder.

New Clinical Study Evaluates First Drug to Show Improvement in Subtype of Autism

Source: 
EurekAlert
Date Published: 
April 26, 2012
Abstract: 

In an important test of one of the first drugs to target core symptoms of autism, researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine are undertaking a pilot clinical trial to evaluate insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) in children who have SHANK3 deficiency (also known as 22q13 Deletion Syndrome or Phelan-McDermid Syndrome), a known cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Agent Reduces Autism-like Behaviors in Mice

Source: 
NIMH
Date Published: 
April 26, 2012
Abstract: 

National Institutes of Health researchers have reversed behaviors in mice resembling two of the three core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). An experimental compound, called GRN-529, increased social interactions and lessened repetitive self-grooming behavior in a strain of mice that normally display such autism-like behaviors, the researchers say.

Evidence behind autism drugs may be biased: study

Source: 
Reuters
Date Published: 
April 24, 2012
Abstract: 

Doctors' belief that certain antidepressants can help to treat repetitive behaviors in kids with autism may be based on incomplete information, according to a new review of published and unpublished research.

Autism science is moving 'stunningly fast'

Source: 
USA Today
Date Published: 
April 10, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers today also say they're beginning to make progress, perhaps for the first time, in understanding the autistic brain.

IACC Releases Its 2011 Summary of Advances in Autism Spectrum Disorder Research

Source: 
IACC
Date Published: 
April 2, 2012
Abstract: 

On April 2, in honor of the fifth annual World Autism Awareness Day and HHS Autism Awareness Month the IACC has released its annual list of scientific advances that represent significant progress in the field.

Clinical trials of new treatments for Fragile X are accepting participants

Source: 
FRAXA Research Foundation
Date Published: 
March 22, 2012
Abstract: 

Experimental new drugs, AFQ056 (an mGluR5 antagonist from Novartis) and STX209 (arbaclofen from Seaside Therapeutics) are in large scale trials.

Understanding Why Autistic People May Reject Social Touch

Source: 
Time Magazine
Date Published: 
March 20, 2012
Abstract: 

Now, a new study offers insight into why some people shrug off physical touches and how families affected by autism may learn to share hugs without overwhelming an autistic child’s senses.

Bone-marrow Transplant Reverses Rett Syndrome in Mice

Source: 
Nature Magazine
Date Published: 
March 17, 2012
Abstract: 

A bone-marrow transplant can treat a mouse version of Rett syndrome, a severe autism spectrum disorder that affects roughly 1 in 10,000–20,000 girls born worldwide (boys with the disease typically die within a few weeks of birth).