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Department of Defense Autism Research Program Funding Opportunities for Fiscal Year 2014

Source: 
Department of Defense Autism Research Program
Date Published: 
April 28, 2014
Abstract: 

Defense Health Program
Department of Defense Autism Research Program
Funding Opportunities for Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14)

The FY14 Defense Appropriations Act provides $6 million (M) to the Department of Defense Autism Research Program (ARP) to support innovative, high-impact autism spectrum disorder research. This program is administered by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) through the Office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

Defense Health Program
Department of Defense Autism Research Program
Funding Opportunities for Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14)
 
 
The FY14 Defense Appropriations Act provides $6 million (M) to the Department of Defense Autism Research Program (ARP) to support innovative, high-impact autism spectrum disorder research.  This program is administered by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) through the Office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).
 
 
 
Clinical Trial Award – Pre-application due date June 10, 2014, if invited to submit full application it is due October 7, 2014
 
Investigators at or above the level of Associate Professor (or equivalent)
·       Supports research with the potential to have a major impact on the treatment and/or management of ASD.
·       Preliminary data relevant to the proposed project are required.
Pre-application is required; application submission is by invitation only.
·    Behavioral and other non-pharmacological therapies
·    Pharmacological treatments in autism or well-defined subgroups of autism (e.g., genetic, phenotypic, co-occurring conditions)
·    Dissemination/Implementation of established, efficacious behavioral interventions
·    Therapies to alleviate conditions co-occurring with ASD (e.g., sleep disturbances, gastro-intestinal issues, aggression, depression, anxiety)
·    The Maximum funding for the entire period of performance is $1,000,000 in direct costs (plus indirect costs)
Maximum period of performance is 5 years
 
Idea Development Award - Pre-application due date June 10, 2014, if invited to submit full application it is due October 7, 2014
 
Investigators at all academic levels (or equivalent)
·       Supports the development of innovative, high-impact ideas that advance the understanding of ASD and ultimately lead to improved outcomes.
·       Preliminary data are required.
·       Multiple Principal Investigator (PI) Option:  Up to three investigators may collaborate on a single application, each of whom will be recognized as a PI and receive a separate award.
Pre-application is required; application submission is by invitation only.
·     Environmental risk factors
·     Mechanisms of heterogeneous clinical expression or response to treatment of ASD, excluding new gene discovery
·     Mechanisms underlying conditions co-occurring with ASD (e.g., sleep disturbances, gastro-intestinal issues, aggression, depression, anxiety)
·     Novel therapeutics using valid preclinical models
Psychosocial factors promoting success in key transitions to independence for individuals living with ASD
·    Maximum funding for the entire period of performance is $335,000 in direct costs (plus indirect costs)
·    For multiple PIs, the combined funding for all PIs for the entire period of performance may not exceed $335,000 in direct costs (plus indirect costs)
Maximum period of performance is 3 years
 
All applications must conform to the final Program Announcements and General Application Instructions that are available for electronic downloading from the Grants.gov website.  The application package containing the required forms for each award mechanism will also be found on Grants.gov.  A listing of all USAMRMC funding opportunities can be obtained on the Grants.gov website by performing a basic search using CFDA Number 12.420.
 
Pre-applications are required and must be submitted through the CDMRP electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org).  Applications must be submitted through the federal government’s single-entry portal, Grants.gov.  Requests for email notification of the Program Announcements release may be sent to help@eBRAP.org.  Email notifications of funding opportunities are sent as a courtesy and should not be used as a sole source of notification; applicants should monitor Grants.gov for official postings of funding opportunities.
 
For more information about the ARP or other CDMRP-administered programs, please visit the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil).
Point of Contact:
CDMRP Hel Desk
301-682-5507 
help@ebrap.org

FDA: Beware of False or Misleading Claims for Treating Autism

Source: 
FDA
Date Published: 
April 25, 2014
Abstract: 

The FDA issued a warning today that several companies are making false or misleading claims about products or therapies that claim to treat or cure autism. The so-called treatments, such as “chelation” therapy or mineral treatments, carry significant risks, FDA says. Please be aware of the FDA's warning and follow their tips to help you identify false or misleading claims.

Repeats in Human DNA may Aggravate Autism Symptoms

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
April 21, 2014
Abstract: 

Certain DNA repeats that increased exponentially during human evolution are directly related to the severity of autism symptoms, according to a preliminary study published in PLoS Genetics. The repeats each span 65 amino acids and are collectively referred to as DUF1220, for ‘domain of unknown function.’ There are six types of these repeats, each with a slightly different sequence and all of which diverged from a common ancestor.

Atypical Cross Talk Between Mentalizing and Mirror Neuron Networks in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Source: 
JAMA Psychiatry
Date Published: 
April 16, 2014
Abstract: 

Atypical brain connectivity in areas that affect social interactions have been found in people with autism spectrum disorders. This difference in connectivity is found in networks of the brain that help individuals understand what others are thinking, and to understand others' actions and emotions. Up until now, it was thought that these areas of the brain were under-connected in people with autism, but this study shows that more often than not, they are actually over-connected. The study also found that the greater the difference in neural connectivity, the more social interactions were impaired.

Request for Information (RFI): Impact of DSM-5 Changes to Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) on Research and Services

Source: 
National Institutes of Health
Date Published: 
April 14, 2014
Abstract: 

The NIH is requesting additional input from the scientific community, health professionals, self-advocates and patient advocates about the research implications of recent changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Responses will be accepted through May 12, 2014.

ASF Video: Five Years of Autism Research

Abstract: 

ASF celebrates its 5th anniversary! Watch to learn about our first five years of searching, solving, and sharing.

CDC Releases 2014 Community Report on Autism

Source: 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Date Published: 
April 11, 2014
Abstract: 

The CDC has released its 2014 Community Report on Autism, which gives details behind the new 1 in 68 number, as well as additional state-by-state prevalence information.

Autism Science Foundation Announces Spring 2014 Pre- and Postdoctoral Grant Recipients

Date Published: 
April 10, 2014
Abstract: 

Nine new projects to be funded.

(April 10, 2014 -- New York, NY)-- The Autism Science Foundation, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to funding autism research, today announced the recipients of its annual pre and post-doctoral fellowships.  5 postdoctoral and 4 predoctoral grants will be awarded to student/mentor teams conducting research in autism interventions, etiology, treatment targets, biomarkers, language development and animal models.

The autism community has demanded more research to understand what is causing autism and to develop better treatments” said ASF president Alison Singer. “We are proud to be able to increase our research funding in response to this national health crisis and we are especially grateful to all our donors and volunteers who have come together to support autism research and make these grants possible”.

In its five years of operations, the Autism Science Foundation has funded over $1.6 million in grants. 

“ASF attracts outstanding applicants across the board, representing a broad range of perspectives on autism science” said Dr. Matthew State, Chair of the ASF Scientific Advisory Board and Chairman of the Psychiatry Department at the University of California, San Francisco. “These projects show great potential to move the field forward.”

The following projects were selected for 2014 funding:
 

Postdoctoral Fellowships:

Dr. Boaz Barak/Dr. Guoping Feng: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Characterizing and Manipulating the Social Reward Dysfunction in a Novel Mouse Model for Autism
Goal:  Provide treatment-facilitating insight into the pathophysiology of autism

Dr. Shweta Ghai/Dr. Gordon Ramsey: Emory University, Marcus Center
Identifying Biomarkers for Early Diagnosis of Prosody Disorder in ASD using Electroglottography
Goal: Improve vocal and language development in children with ASD

Dr. Katherine Kuhl-Meltzoff Stavropoulos/ Dr. James McPartland: Yale University 
The Effects of Oxytocin on Social Learning in Individuals with ASD
Goal: Understand who may or may not benefit from oxytocin treatment

Dr. Julia Parish-Morris/Dr. Robert Schultz: University of Pennsylvania
Developing Automated Algorithms to Assess Linguistic Variation in Individuals with Autism
Goal: Design effective, personalized interventions for pragmatic language deficits

Dr. Aarthi Padmanabhan/Dr. Vinod Menon: Stanford University
Social Motivations and Striatal Circuit Development in Children and Adolescents with Autism
Goal: Determine windows of brain plasticity during which intervention may be especially successful

 

Predoctoral Fellowships:

Alexandra Bey/Dr. Yong-hui Jiang: Duke University
The Role of Shank3 in Neocortex Versus Striatum and the Pathophysiology of Autism
Goal: Determine whether and how specific brain regions control specific ASD-related behaviors

Nick Goeden/Dr. Alexandre Bonnin: University of Southern California
The Impact of Maternal Inflammation During Pregnancy on Placental Tryptophan Metabolism, and the Downstream Consequences on Fetal Brain Development
Goal: Understand the impact of prenatal inflammation and infection on fetal brain circuits and ASD development

Erin Li/Dr. Alexander Kolevzon: Seaver Autism Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai 
Mapping the Neurobehavioral Phenotype in Autism and Phelan McDermid Syndrome
Goal: Characterize the clinical features of Phelan McDermid Syndrome compared to idiopathic autism; provide autism-intensive training to medical school students to build a pipeline of knowledgeable, autism-friendly physicians

Donghui Wei/Dr. Daniele Piomelli: University of California, Irvine
Endocannabinod Enhancement of Sociability in Autism-related Mouse Models 
Goal: Develop and test novel therapies for ASD

 

The Autism Science Foundation (ASF) is a 501(c) (3) public charity. Its mission is to support autism research by providing funding to scientists and organizations conducting autism research. ASF also provides information about autism to the general public and serves to increase awareness of autism spectrum disorders and the needs of individuals and families affected by autism. To learn more about the Autism Science Foundation or to make a donation visit www.autismsciencefoundation.org

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Contact Info:    
Casey Gold
Program Associate
Autism Science Foundation
212-391-3913
cgold@autismsciencefoundation.org

IACC Issues Statement Regarding Implications of Changes in the Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Source: 
Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee
Date Published: 
April 2, 2014
Abstract: 

Today, on World Autism Awareness Day 2014, the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), issued a statement regarding the implications of changes in the diagnostic criteria for ASD that were made in the most recent update of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Of particular interest are the scientific, practice, and policy implications as DSM-5 is implemented in real-world settings, especially with respect to allocation of services.

Hilibrand Autism Symposium: Carving a Place in the World for Young Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Hilibrand Autism Symposium
Date Published: 
April 1, 2014
Abstract: 

Every adult wants to lead a meaningful life, and individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are no different. More and more, people with ASD are working, living, and engaging in their communities, and are being recognized for their strengths and talents. Yet the questions still remain: What do young adults with ASD need to transition to being productive members of society whose skills and interests are used and valued? How can professionals, parents, advocates, and others ensure that a place in the world is carved out for these individuals? This conference will present new research and innovative models to spark a dialogue about current challenges and effective solutions to helping adults with ASD obtain and maintain work, social connections, and independence.

ASF Scientific Advisory Board Member David Mandell will be giving the keynote address.

Tune into the Hilibrand Autism Symposium lifestream today from 9:00am to 4:30pm at
http://www.ujafedny.org/autism-symposium/