Investigating neurocognitive profiles in parents of children with autism and anorexia

Researchers at Deakin University are seeking participants for an online study investigating how and why personality traits, characteristics, and behaviours associated with autism and anorexia are related.

What are the goals of the study?

We are doing this research because there is evidence that autism and anorexia might overlap, and we want to understand this overlap better. Better understanding of factors that contribute to the overlap between autism and anorexia will help us to better detect these conditions and offer appropriate support to those who require it.

What will happen during the visit or online?

If you choose to participate in this study, you will be invited to complete an online survey and computerised tasks. The study will take approximately 1 hour to complete, and upon completion, participants will go into the draw to win one of 10 AUD$150 gift cards.

How will this help families?

Improving understanding of these disorders will help us identify appropriate support for individuals with autism and improve clinical practice.

What are the goals of the study?

A short, online survey about words and phrases used when talking about autism. Our aim is to inform how communities may best and most supportively discuss autism.

What will happen during the visit or online?

You will be asked to rate a list of words/phrases commonly associated with autism based on how harmful/pathologizing vs affirming/helpful you believe they are.

How will this help families?

Study findings will be used to make recommendations about language that is most preferred and affirming when talking about autism. Following these recommendations will allow individuals on the spectrum and their families to receive care that aligns with the values of the autism community and inform training and education efforts.

The study of people with new onset face blindness points to a particular brain circuit. We are investigating if this same brain circuit is involved in face recognition difficulty in individuals with autism. If successful, this study may identify new ways to improve face recognition ability.

What are the goals of the study?

Some individuals with autism have difficulties related to face processing and recognition, which can have substantial effects on everyday life. For this study, we hope to figure out where these face processing difficulties arise in the brain. This research could help us provide targets for treatment and could aid in the development of biomarkers for future detection.

What will happen during the visit or online?

The study involves one virtual visit and one visit to Boston Children’s Hospital. The first study visit will involve a series of computer activities designed to measure face processing and should last around 2 hours. The second study visit will involve an MRI, during which the participant will complete additional face processing tasks. This second visit may last up to 3 hours. In between these two visits, we will also share a link to some questionnaires to be completed online by the participant and a caregiver.

How will this help families?

It may lead to new treatments for face recognition difficulties which may help social development.

In less than 45 minutes, participants can help us understand the greater extent of mental abilities seen in autism and help dispel harmful per-conceived notions of the autistic mind.

What are the goals of the study?

This study aims to understand how people mentally represent others on a more nuanced level.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Participants will read short (4-sentence) stories and make True/False responses about the people in them. Then participants will read statements and judge how pragmatically sound they are for communication.

How will this help families?

Improving our understanding of the social brain can inform the way families affected by autism understand and interact with their loved ones. Allow them to enjoy an improved quality of life, based on an understanding of autism gained through scientific insights.

Research shows that many children on the autism spectrum experience high levels of anxiety, but most of the questionnaires used to measure their anxiety were developed for neurotypical children. We are interested in understanding the way children on the autism spectrum experience anxiety, and whether these questionnaires do a good job of measuring their anxiety symptoms. In this study, ask parents/caregivers to tell us about how their child shows their general, day-to-day anxiety, and their thoughts on how well a widely used anxiety questionnaire aligns with their child’s anxiety presentation.

What are the goals of the study?

The goal of this study is to identify ways that trait anxiety manifests in children on the autism spectrum. We will also investigate whether a standardised trait anxiety questionnaire does a good job of measuring their anxiety symptoms.

What will happen during the visit or online?

We are asking parents of a child on the autism spectrum to answer an online questionnaire that will take around 45 minutes to complete. The questions are about how the parents observe anxiety in their child on the autism spectrum and asks for their feedback on a trait anxiety questionnaire.

How will this help families?

This research will help professionals and other researchers to understand which anxiety questionnaires are suitable to use with children on the autism spectrum, which improves their understanding of the child’s experience.

This study will test the Training to Understand and Navigate Interactions (TUNE In) program via a randomized control trial.

What are the goals of the study?

The purpose of this study is to develop and test ways of helping adults with autism to improve their social functioning.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Complete psychological questionnaires at three points. 50% chance to receive 17-week TUNE In Program consisting of individual sessions, group sessions, and advocacy sessions.

How will this help families?

Participation could lead to increased interest in interacting with others; improved ability to understand other people, emotions, and communication between people; improved social skills; and an improved ability to apply that understanding and skill to day-to-day life. These improvements could lead to better interactions with other people in many settings.

SOR is highly prevalent in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), causing discomfort and stress, impacting daily life.

What are the goals of the study?

The goal of the study is to see what effects transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has on neurobiological mechanisms underlying sensory over-responsiveness (SOR) in individuals with autism.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Participants will undergo MRI and TMS as well as answer online questionnaires.

How will this help families?

To date there a few treatments for SOR and TMS could be a treatment that ends up dramatically improving the quality of life of ASD individuals and their families.

We still know too little about the basis of social cognition (emotions, thinking about others, interacting with others) in the brain to explain variations in people’s behavior (e.g., among allistic and autistic people). This study aims at helping us understand mechanisms in the brain better and connect them to relevant social behavior in people. If you are interested you can chose which parts of the study you want to participate in (from computer tasks, to questionnaires to brain scans).

What are the goals of the study?

This study aims at investigating the basis of human social cognition in behavior, brain function, and structure. One population with difficulties navigating our social world is autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Studying atypical processing in populations such as those with ASD, is thus of paramount value to social cognition. By studying both healthy and impaired social functioning, this study aims at advancing a mechanistic understanding of social cognition in behavior, brain function and brain structure.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Participants will be invited to participate in one or more of our ongoing experiments in this study to study social cognition in brain and behavior. The study consists of a research brain scan (MRI) and simple behavioral tasks and questionnaires assessing social behavior. The study will consist of multiple sessions each not exceeding 3 hours, with the time between sessions varying from one day (minimum) to a maximum of one year.

How will this help families?

The research may help in our understanding of how the brain functions to generate and process social behavior, and will provide insights on how mental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, may affect social cognition This information may expand our knowledge of these socio-cognitive processes and may have future implications for diagnosis and treatment of future patients. Participants (and families) do not receive any direct benefits from the study (other than compensation for research participation).

What are the goals of the study?

We are currently working on a project that aims to better understand how autistic people are influenced by sensory information (sights, sounds, etc.) while walking. In our current study, we are asking people to walk on a mat while they wear a virtual reality headset where they look at a sidewalk that is empty or a sidewalk that is in a busy area (pedestrians, billboards, etc.). While wearing the headset they will also hear sounds that correspond to these sidewalk situations (either silence or the types of noises you would expect if you were walking down a busy sidewalk). While they are walking, we record the pressure their feet exert on the mat and we compare these pressure patterns across the different conditions (busy and empty sidewalk, loud and quiet noise), to study whether different amounts of sensory information influence walking patterns.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Participants will be asked to fill out questionnaires, solve puzzles, and walk on a sensored mat while wearing virtual reality goggles.

How will this help families?

The study will help us to inform the development of environments that are more accessible for people with autism.

What are the goals of the study?

Researchers from Rutgers University are recruiting children/adults and their parents or caregivers for a research study assessing the utility of a diagnostic interview for autism evaluations.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Children/adults will complete questionnaires (if able) and one 2-3 hour diagnostic evaluation. Parents/caregivers will complete questionnaires and two 2-4 hour interviews. A 1-hour feedback session to review test results.

How will this help families?

Families who complete the study will receive a brief written summary of results from their assessment and a $75 gift card.

This study is important because it can provide new understandings of social mechanisms in autistic individuals, a largely under-investigated area of autism. It might also have long term impact and clinical utility as results might inform better knowledge about social space in autism, which may lead to better behavioral interventions and therapies to assist autistic individuals in their qualities of life. At the same time, participation in this study culminates in participants receiving testing reports of evaluations that generally can cost upwards of $1000-2000 for free.

What are the goals of the study?

The overall goal of the study is to understand differences in neural computations of social interactions in autism using dynamic tasks and neuroimaging methods.

What will happen during the visit or online?

It involves 2-3 in person visits for EEG, MRI tasks, and clinical assessments, as well as remote surveys and clinical assessments. You will be compensated $20 an hour for your time, which should be about $150 in total.

How will this help families?

Help to better understand the social brain and phenotype of autism in order to provide new insights into treatment targets.

This study could help dispel dated and harmful notions about the limits of the autistic mind. We aim to understand certain forms of social cognition on a more nuanced level to explore the greater extent of autistic abilities beyond what has been previously assumed.

What are the goals of the study?

To understand complex social cognitive processes and their instantiation in neuro-divergent individuals.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Online Study: Participation usually takes less than 1 hour and entails reading short (4 sentence) stories and quickly answering True/False prompts. Then making judgements about the linguistic “strangeness” of statements made about agents in stories.

How will this help families?

The results of this study will provide new insight on the nature of certain cognitive processes. Equipped with this new knowledge, families of individuals affected by autism can better understand and interact with this population such that one’s quality of life may be improved.