Eye-tracking In-person Research

In this study, we will present a series of validated eye tracking paradigms (e.g., images of faces, videos of social interactions) while we monitor eye movements and physiological arousal. Two research assistants will also collect behavioral reports of ASD and ADHD symptoms from 8-12 years old participants. These data will allow us to examine how and if eye movements, arousal, and questionnaire outcomes differ between children with ASD and ADHD. By combining eye tracking/arousal measures and behavioral assessments, we will then draft a map of how these social cognitive traits manifest in eye movements.

What are the goals of the study?

The primary aim of this study is to test the utility of a social cognitive battery incorporating psychophysiological measures to differentiate between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

What will happen during the visit or online?

A brief telephone screening will be conducted to determine if the child and family are interested in the study. Then, a research team member will schedule a time for the family to come into the lab for approximately 90 minutes. Prior to the visit, parents will be asked to send a copy of a recent diagnostic assessment to confirm diagnosis. During the visit, the participant will come to our lab with their parent. Upon completion of the consent and assent, cognitive screener will be conducted first to the child and then the eye tracking tasks will be administered using the Eyelink 1000. We will ask the child to sit in front of a computer screen, and we will be showing the child some videos and images while the computer will track the child’s physiological response and their eye movements. Parent and caregivers will complete a few questionnaires by the time. Upon completion of all measures, the participant will be given a $20 gift card for their time.

How will this help families?

Families will receive a feedback summary compiling information regarding their responses on questionnaires, including the Conners, SRS, and CBCL. Families will learn about their children’s current condition in behavior performances and cognitive development. If requested by contacting the lab via phone or email (or indicating during the study visit), a 15 minute phone feedback session will be scheduled for the parents with the PI, clinical psychologist, to discuss the results from the questionnaires. This will also offer the PI a chance to address any other questions the parents may have. Participants will also be compensated $20 for their time.

This is a research study to learn more about how children learn to understand language, and the role that caregivers play in this process. By learning more about these processes, we may be able to contribute to a better understanding of language development and impairment and the design of more effective intervention programs and therapies to support language learning. This study will be conducted by Dr. Sudha Arunachalam of the Communicative Sciences and Disorders department at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University, and Dr. Rhiannon Luyster of the Communicative Sciences and Disorders department at Emerson College.

What are the goals of the study?

Learn more about how children learn to understand language, and the role that caregivers play in this process.

What will happen during the visit or online?

If you give permission for your child to participate in this study, your child will be asked to play some games with us in the lab at 665 Broadway in Manhattan, and have a play session at home over web camera on your computer or tablet via Zoom videoconferencing software. You will be with your child the entire time. The in-person study is schedule for 1.5 hours, and the Zoom conferencing part of the study will take approximately 30-45 minutes of you and your child’s time.

The study also involves online surveys that can be completed by you from any location on a desktop, laptop, or tablet computer. These surveys will focus on your child’s demographics, daily activities, and language use, and will take up to 30 minutes to complete.

How will this help families?

We may be able to contribute to a better understanding of language development and impairment and the design of more effective intervention programs and therapies to support language learning.

Dr. Eggebrecht and researchers at Washington University in St. Louis are mapping brain function in children with autism spectrum disorder with diffuse optical tomography.

What are the goals of the study?

Dr. Eggebrecht and researchers at Washington University in St. Louis aim to investigate brain function underlying development in children who have or are at risk for developing Autism Spectrum Disorder.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Children will complete a 1-hour brain imaging scan and developmental testing at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Parents will complete online and phone surveys from home. Families will be compensated $25/hour for their participation.

How will this help families?

We hope that, in the future, society may benefit from study results which increase our understanding of typical and altered development of brain function. We hope that in the future, optical imaging will complement the current brain imaging technologies in the management of a variety of patient populations.

This pediatric autism clinical research study is currently testing the drug, pimavanserin, to see if it is safe and effective in treating irritability and other behaviors in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Study participation will last for up to 14 weeks, with a 6-week treatment period. Children who enroll in this study will receive either the study drug or placebo. A placebo looks like the study drug but has no impact on the person taking it. There will be no cost for the study drug or any study-related procedures. You may be compensated for your time and travel. If your child completes the 6-week treatment period, they may be able to enroll in a 52-week, open-label extension study if they qualify. During this open-label study, there is no placebo. Children who enroll will receive the study drug, pimavanserin.

What are the goals of the study?

The overall goal of this study is to evaluate whether an investigational drug might help relieve irritable behaviors associated with Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorder that make social interactions and everyday functioning challenging.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Study participation will last for up to 14 weeks, with a 6-week treatment period. Children who enroll in this study will receive either the study drug or placebo. A placebo looks like the study drug but has no impact on the person taking it. There will be no cost for the study drug or any study-related procedures. You may be compensated for your time and travel.
If your child completes the 6-week treatment period, they may be able to enroll in a 52-week, open-label extension study if they qualify. During this open-label study, there is no placebo. Children who enroll will receive the study drug, pimavanserin.

How will this help families?

The evaluation of this investigational drug may help relieve irritable behaviors associated with Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorder that make social interactions and everyday functioning challenging.

The Wall Lab has already conducted feasibility testing to show that GuessWhat has the potential to impact outcomes on standard behavioral measures. This low-commitment option is a prosocial game, where instead of drawing the player into an immersive game experience, the child actively engages with their social partner in order to perform well in the game. We hope our study testing this game, which leverages machine learning and science-backed treatment approaches, will be an engaging and rewarding experience for families, and that it will provide evidence for therapeutic impact.

What are the goals of the study?

The following study aims to understand the efficacy of the mobile game platform, GuessWhat, in delivering behavioral therapy to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

What will happen during the visit or online?

If you participate, you will be asked to complete a set of questionnaires that take approximately 1 hour to complete before and 4 weeks after being enrolled in the study. These questionnaires will ask about basic demographics, about your experience as a parents, and about your child’s social communication skills. 50% of participants will be randomly assigned to the treatment group, these participants will use a mobile app for 4 weeks after enrolling. 50% of participants will be in the control group, these participants will continue their normal routine for 4 weeks, before being asked to complete the second set of questionnaires.

How will this help families?

We hope the study game itself will be a fun game for families to play that encourages social communication. We are conducting this study to see if our game-based digital therapeutic can be an effective early intervention option for children with ASD. Results from this study will further understanding with regard to designing digital therapeutics for children with special needs.

What are the goals of the study?

We are carrying out an interview research study in the US and Canada which will involve interviews with autistic adolescents and supporters of autistic children and adolescents.
The aim of the study is to understand everyday life with autism and to understand the most important characteristics and impacts of autism that should be measured in future clinical studies. We will use this information to develop a new questionnaire and a personalised goal setting approach in order to measure what matters to autistic people.

What will happen during the visit or online?

● Speak to a researcher during two one-to-one interviews, which should last around 60-75 minutes each
● Talk about the experience/their child’s experience of living with autism
● Give honest feedback about some questionnaires
● In appreciation of your time, you will be reimbursed after each interview (two interviews in total).

How will this help families?

There is no direct medical benefit from being in this study. The information learnt from this study may help researchers and doctors learn more about autism in general. Your child and others with autism may benefit from the results of such research in the future, as we seek to develop a new questionnaire and a personalised goal setting approach in order to measure what matters to autistic people.

Children with ASD experience a wide range of outcomes, and not all children respond effectively to behavioral interventions. There is accumulating evidence of tDCS (mild brain stimulation) being effective in treating the comorbidities as well as the core symptoms of ASD. tDCS is most effective when used simultaneously with behavior intervention. In this study, we will isolate the effects of tDCS alone and in combination with ABA on the executive functioning skills and the core symptoms of ASD and monitor the results using an objective neurophysiological test (EEG).

What are the goals of the study?

The goal of this study is to see if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) when used during ABA therapy improves learning in children with ASD. If your child takes part in the research, s/he will receive tDCS while receiving her/his ABA therapy.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Your child will participate in the study for a total of five months. S/he will receive 20 sessions of tDCS as well as 20 sessions sham (fake) tDCS. Each session is 20-mins long. A resting electroencephalogram (EEG) using a portable headset will be obtained about one time per month. Most study procedures will be done remotely but several in-person visits are required.

How will this help families?

Potential benefits of tDCS are improvements in executive function skills, decrease in the core symptoms of ASD, and/or greater learning acquisition during ABA therapy in study participants. However, there may not be any benefit at all – that is why we are conducting this study.

The genetic changes we study in TIGER3 have been connected with autism and developmental disabilities, but we are just beginning to learn how those changes might affect each person and family differently, and what effects might be shared versus unique across those genetic variants. By learning more about the shared and unique effects of these rare variants, we aim to contribute to (1) better understanding of co-occurring medical and behavioral conditions, and (2) development of individualized supports for affected individuals and their families.

What are the goals of the study?

In the TIGER research study, we are learning more about individuals with genetic events associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disability (ID), and/or developmental delay (DD). We hope to better understand and describe how different gene changes influence the development, behavior, and experiences of children and adults. Individuals with these genetic changes may have neurodevelopmental differences that we would like to better understand.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Eligible families participate in a consent phone call, and are then invited to complete a series of video- or phone calls to assess for autism-associated features, adaptive skills, cognitive skills, and medical history. Caregivers are also invited to complete a variety of online questionnaires, including measures of adaptive behavior, treatment history, sleep habits, gastrointestinal symptoms, social-emotional functioning, and executive function. Biospecimen (blood or saliva) collection is completed remotely. Finally, families are offered a feedback session with a clinician and a written report of standardized measures and recommendations.

How will this help families?

Families will be compensated $100 for their participation. Participants may receive feedback about their family’s genetic event(s). Families will also receive written and/or verbal feedback regarding adaptive behavior, social communication skills, language skills, and cognitive skills as available from completed study activities.

Autistic children frequently engage in repetitive and inflexible behaviors, and sometimes these behaviors can significantly interfere with child learning, are associated with long-term functional impairment, and co-occurring psychiatric conditions (e.g., anxiety). However, there is a significant gap in effective interventions that address repetitive and inflexible behaviors. The FITBI Study partners caregivers of autistic children with trained therapists to provide coaching for inflexible or repetitive behaviors that are interfering with parent or child quality of life.

What are the goals of the study?

Researchers at the University of Kansas are currently recruiting for a study that provides parent coaching to address the repetitive or inflexible behaviors of autistic children between the ages of 3 to 9 years old. The Family-Implemented Treatment for Behavioral Inflexibility (FITBI) project partners eligible participants with a trained coach to receive individualized support via telehealth.

What will happen during the visit or online?

If you and your child qualify to participate, you will be partnered with a trained coach to receive free, individualized support. Here are a few important details about the research study:
• The study will primarily take place via a secure telehealth video meeting system. Depending on family proximity, there could be home visits to collect data.
• Caregiver participation includes attending weekly telehealth sessions with a trained coach and completing online surveys and brief interviews about yourself and your child.
• Participants can receive up to $120 in compensation for participating.
• Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups.
• Participants will be recruited from the states of Kansas and Missouri.

How will this help families?

The overall goal of the FITBI Study is to determine whether a new form of family-based intervention for repetitive and inflexible behaviors, delivered using videoconferencing technology, can counter any negative effects of those behaviors and improve positive outcomes for young autistic children. Results from this study could have substantial implications for remotely delivered interventions that address the repetitive and inflexible behaviors of autistic children.

There is a clear unmet need for new medicines to treat irritability in children with ASD that do not have the metabolic and weight adverse event profiles of the currently approved treatments. Cannabidivarin (CBDV), a nonpsychoactive phytocannabinoid with no appreciable tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has potential therapeutic effects on irritability and disruptive behaviors, repetitive behaviors, sociability, and quality of life, as well as the capacity to reduce inflammation.

What are the goals of the study?

This study aims to examine the efficacy and safety of CBDV, with a primary aim of studying its effect on irritability in children with ASD.

What will happen during the visit or online?

It will take about 16 weeks to complete this study. During this time, we will ask you to come to Albert Einstein College of Medicine 4 times for study visits. (Baseline, Week 4, Week 8, and Week 12). In addition, we will ask you to complete 5 remote visits. Two out of these 5 remote visits will involve assessments performed over the phone, as well as a visit to your local QUEST diagnostic center (at no cost to you, at Screening and Week 2 ) The other 3 remote visits will only involve assessments performed over the phone (Weeks 6, 10, and 14). On-site visits include a physical and neurological exam, measuring vital signs, lab work, and completion of assessments/questionnaires. An ECG will be completed at Baseline and Week 12.

How will this help families?

The goal of this study is to see if CBDV can improve irritability and disruptive behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder, without the weight gain and metabolic side effects of the FDA approved antipsychotics aripiprazole and risperidone.

This is the first study to consider the neural indices of cognitive inflexibility in autism. Since cognitive inflexibility is related to core autism features, we hope that findings from this project will support the field’s goal to inform prevention and treatment interventions to inform personalized interventions that address specific outcomes.

What are the goals of the study?

This study seeks to examine core behavioral and neural presentations associated with cognitive inflexibility (CI) in both autistic and non-autistic youth. The current project is also aimed at validating specific neural indices associated with CI and better understand links between neural indices and behavioral presentations of CI. This study will further examine relations of CI to core autism symptoms (i.e., social communication deficits and RRBs), as well as co-occurring psychopathology that cause significant impairment.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Participants will complete behavioral assessments (ADOS, DKEFS, EFCT), cognitive assessment (KBIT), an EEG task, and self-report measures. Parents will also complete parent-report measures.

How will this help families?

Upon request, the research team will provide a research report of all assessment results (including ADOS) that can be shared with other service providers, schools, etc.

SOR is a highly prevalent feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). SOR can be highly disruptive yet there are few treatments to deal with this discomfort. This study can validate a readily available medication to be used as a treatment for SOR.

What are the goals of the study?

The goal of the study is to examine the short-term effect of propranolol on observed sensory over-responsiveness (SOR) behaviors. The study will also look at biomarkers (heart rate, sweat response, neural activity) associated with a SOR response to characterize the effect of propranolol.

What will happen during the visit or online?

Participants will take medication at two time points and then complete an MRI and sensory games. Families are also asked to complete questionnaires as part of the study. Short cognitive assessments may be completed to confirm eligibility for the study.

How will this help families?

Participating in this study will allow families to see if propranolol is an effective intervention for SOR and can help with discomfort or distress associated with it. This study can also lead to clinical trials aimed at finding more treatments for ASD individuals with SOR.