Podcast: INSAR with a T, for “technology”

Lots of news outlets have great summaries of things that were presented at the International Society for Autism Research. However, one area was relatively missed:  technology. This week’s podcast summarizes advances in technology for people with autism, how they are being used, what they could be used for and how they will improve services and help for those on the spectrum.  They range from ways to aid diagnosis, to better understanding of features and symptoms in different settings, to improved intervention. Listen to the podcast here.

On this week’s podcast, Melissa Scott of Curtin University discusses findings from the first paper out of Curtin’s collaboration with ASF, Stony Brook University, and Karolinska Institutet on an international policy brief on employment for people with autism. Based on a scoping review of existing research on employment practices, the environment was one crucial element missing as a focus from all the intervention studies. Findings from the scoping review were presented at the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) 2018 Annual Meeting in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

This week’s podcast is a short summary of just a few of the presentations. There was more of an emphasis on what has been called “real life” research questions like employment, quality of life, and relationships. As a result, some of the more basic science questions around autism are now being presented at other meetings. This is a shame. This podcast follows some of those basic science questions to the now translational opportunities that were presented at the meeting. It also highlights some newer findings that will provide help to people at all ages who need supports and services.

On this week’s podcast, Dr. Lori Sacrey of the University of Alberta highlights findings from a multi-site study she led that investigated how well parent report measures could predict an ASD diagnosis for at-risk infants. Plus, the journal Autism decided to move away from the puzzle piece symbol in this new era of autism research.

On Tuesday September 12th, the Autism Science Foundation, the Lerner Lab at Stony Brook University, Curtin University in Australia and Karolinska Institute in Sweden launched the first multinational survey designed to identify needs, gaps in services, and opportunities for employers.  The results of this survey will be used to develop a policy brief around employment in autism.  You can access the survey through the Lerner Lab website HERE.  This project is supported in part by the International Society for Autism Research.